Research

Nanotechnology to treat hearing loss

RESEARCH

© Piotr Marcinski - Fotolia

Manipulation of matter on an atomic and molecular level is an important new area of science and the applications of these nanotechnologies in biomedical research are receiving growing interest. Researchers from the Bionics Institute and the University of Melbourne in Australia have developed a specific application using nanoparticles as a drug delivery system to the inner ear, a notoriously difficult part of the ear to reach.

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Noise reduction: the difference between ‘noise haters’ and ‘distortion haters’

Clinical Physicist Audiologist (i.o.) dr.ir. Rolph Houben of the Academical Medical Centre (AMC) Amsterdam (The Netherlands) investigates what noise reduction really does in the patient. Step by step he unravels the mystery of noise reduction.

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Noise is not just damaging to your ears

RESEARCH

© UFO73370 - Fotolia

The effects of noise on hearing, and psychological well-being (sleep and nervousness) are well known, but researchers from the Department of Environmental Health, Boston University, along with other scientists from Harvard and the NMR Group, set out to determine whether exposure to aircraft noise increases the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases.

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New brain imaging device to assess cochlear implants

RESEARCH

© Andrea Danti - Fotolia

A joint venture by a multidisciplinary team of researchers in cochlear implant technology, hearing disorders, cognitive and language sciences, and brain imaging, has now made it possible for the first time to better understand how the human brain processes input from a cochlear implant (CI).

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Improved complex language skills in children with cochlear implants

Research

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© M.V.L.

The significant positive effects of cochlear implants (CIs) on spoken language development are well documented, even though there is wide variability in language outcomes in these children.

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Bats in Costa Rica using leaves for hearing

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© Gucio_55/fotolia.com

There are many examples in nature of animals using objects to boost their calls, but situations where animals use objects to amplify sound are not nearly as frequent. Livescience reports on research showing how a social species of Costa Rican bats uses funneling leaves as a type of ear horn to hear other members of their group.

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Ecstasy and noise: a deafening mix

Research

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© Jean-Etienne Minh-Duy Poirrier (CC by-sa)

It seems that ear damage from noise and the drug ecstasy make for a deafening mix. American researchers at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan (USA) have shown that ecstasy, chemically MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine), worsens hearing loss related to noise trauma.

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Effects of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery on hearing

Research

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© Massimo G./Fotolia

Researchers at the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, in Chandigarh, India, have studied the effects of cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation on hearing function, and have confirmed earlier reports of complications affecting hearing, thought to have an incidence of 1/1,000 cases.

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Intelligent hearing aids: technology to tune out background noise

Research

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© Flynt/Dreamstime

Richard Turner, an engineer with the Computational Perception Group in the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge in the UK, is working on technology that aims to identify corrupting ambient noise and to remove these sounds selectively using a statistical approach.

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How is sound amplified in the cochlea?

Research

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© Dr. M. Leibovici/Institut Pasteur

The ciliated cells in the cochlea are the motor for hearing. The internal cells transmit sound to the brain, while the external ones amplify the sound. Without them, our surroundings would be nearly impossible to hear (the sensitivity is increased by approximately 60 dB).

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