Research

Health survey among Europeans on biomedical research

Survey

© Dain Hubley - Sxc

To mark its 50th anniversary, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) recently commissioned IPSOS, a large market survey company, to conduct a study on Europeans and biomedical research. To create a general picture, an internet survey was conducted including 1,001 French, 1,004 German, 1,001 Italian and 1,005 British respondents.

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Potential neurotoxic pesticides and hearing loss

Research

© adampilorz - Fotolia

Many chemical substances are thought to be ototoxic, including toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene, carbon disulfide, lead, mercury and carbon monoxide. Several pesticides are suspected of being neurotoxic in humans and may therefore affect the auditory system. Researchers from the Department of Occupational Hygiene, Monte Porzio Catone, Rome, Italy, have analyzed human and experimental animal studies that tested the hypothesis that exposure to pesticides may be associated with hearing loss.

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Toxic effects of bisphenol A: hearing no exception

Research

© Dr_JAb - Flickr

In recent years, scientists have discovered several new toxic effects of bisphenol A, a carbon-based synthetic compound frequently used in plastics and epoxy resins. And it appears from a new study that the auditory system is no exception. A team of researchers from the French national center for scientific research (CNRS) has demonstrated how bisphenol A (BPA) is involved in malformation of otoliths, small structures in the inner ear that serve to control balance and also play a role in hearing.

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Ways of reducing hearing loss risks of living in a noisy world discussed at the World Congress of Audiology

EVENT

© The International Society of Audiology

Last week, international hearing experts at the XXXII World Congress of Audiology in Brisbane discussed ways to offset a predicted increase in noise-induced hearing loss and tinnitus caused by increasing recreational and occupational noise exposure. Living in a Noisy World Roundtable Convenor Dr Thais C. Morata (US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, from the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention) said our increase in noise exposure is caused by the world undergoing the fastest phase of growth and urbanisation in human history.

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Hearing technologies could play an important role in delaying dementia

EVENT

© The International Society of Audiology

New research into understanding how the brain adapts and improves its hearing abilities through the use of hearing technologies could play an important role in the future management of dementia. The use of devices such as hearing aids and cochlear implants to delay and/or reverse cognitive decline in conditions such as dementia was one of the topics discussed at the XXXII World Congress of Audiology in Brisbane this week.

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NOISE: online database highlights risks to hearing

International Noise Awareness Day 2014

Researchers from the National Acoustic Laboratories (NAL) have been recording some of the country’s noisier recreational environments and uploaded the results of their efforts to a new website known as the NOISE Database.

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Personality changes in elderly with hearing loss

Research

Changes in personality are now known to occur across the life span but were previously thought to slow or stop from early adulthood. In recently reported findings published by researchers from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, a link was demonstrated between hearing impairment and a steeper age-related decline in extraversion in the elderly.

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New study: hearing aids improve speech and language development

Research

© Jennifer Russell-Dreamstime

Although it is commonly accepted that providing hearing aids to children with hearing loss early on has a positive effect on their speech and language development, there are few published empirical studies evaluating the effectiveness of this practice.

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Korean study: prevalence and risk factors of tinnitus

Research

© KCI1 - Fotolia

The word “tinnitus” comes from the latin term tinnire meaning to ring, reflecting the perception of sound that affected people experience in the absence of any corresponding external stimulus. Tinnitus is clinically heterogeneous and is known to be a common condition but exact prevalence is very difficult to estimate.

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Improving hearing through dietary supplements

Research

© Bernd Esche-Dreamstime

Genetic mutations in the GJB2 gene, encoding Connexin 26 which is involved in diffusion of materials between cells, are the most common cause of genetic hearing loss. These mutations represent up to half of cases of recessive genetic deafness. The hearing loss may be mild to profound and is usually stable, but in some patients it may be progressive.

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