Research

Negative effects of suppressing tinnitus

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© Tan Kian Khoon/Fotolia

A recent Swedish study looked at the psychological processes involved in the development of tinnitus distress by examining the costs of suppressing an emotional sound that simulated the experience of tinnitus.

Hugo Hesser has for several years studied tinnitus, and

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Speech in noise improves with age in kids

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© G. Ossa / colombiafoto

Researchers in the People’s Republic of China have found that speech perception ability in noisy environments improves with age, most notably between the ages of three and four years. The research was aimed improving early alternatives for Mandarin-speaking children with hearing impairments. The speech perception abilities

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Smoke exposure affects newborn hearing

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© Konstantin Yuganov / Fotolia

A study from Western Michigan University has found significant cotinine level elevations in mothers who smoked more than 10 cigarettes a day during pregnancy compared to non-smoking mothers. Prenatal smoke exposure has been shown to change cochlear echo response amplitudes and auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave latencies in newborns.

“Since gene expression changes are often synchronized in different tissue types,

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How to hear when the pinna is absent

Microtia artresia is a pathology present at birth with multiple causes and which manifests itself through a malformation of the structures of the outer and middle ear. In Mexico, one of these cases appears in every six thousand newborn, and such patients are eligible for high technology treatment and cosmetic solutions.

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Princeton use 3-D Printing to create bionic ear

Research

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© Frank Wojciechowski

Get ready for the world’s first “bionic” ear: Using 3-D printing tools, scientists at Princeton University have created a functional ear that can "hear" radio frequencies far beyond the range of normal human capability. The researchers' primary purpose was to explore an efficient and versatile method of merging electronics with

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Manchester researchers breakthrough in understanding inherited deafness

Research

A major breakthrough in the understanding of infertility problems and inherited deafness was announced by Manchester researchers last week – after they discovered a previously unknown gene.

The gene was identified by a team from Manchester Biomedical research Centre at Saint Mary’s Hospital and the University of Manchester.

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Link between autism and SSCD discovered

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© Fakhar

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are often described as being preoccupied with, or agitated by, noise. This hypersensitivity in ASD children may have a link to superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome (SSCD), which often causes dizziness or vertigo in patients. The aim of a study, conducted by researchers at Mansoura University in Egypt, was to evaluate the prevalence and

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No link between aggression and device failure

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© Héctor Landaeta

Bad behavior in young children with hearing loss is not an indicator of device failure or a predictor of poor language development, according to Ohio researchers. Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center researchers conducted a longitudinal study of children ages 18 to 48 months with hearing loss, including some with cochlear implants. They found

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The age effect on auditory processing

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© iSonic

Studying young versus middle-aged subjects may be a more effective way of avoiding the confound of high-frequency hearing loss in elderly persons when studying age effects on auditory processing, according to researchers at the University of Alabama.

Researchers in the past have been challenged by various dimensions of auditory processing -- especially the perception of speech in the presence of background competition -- which have been shown to deteriorate with age, say the authors. “A persistent problem in the assessment of these age-related changes has been

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Family hearing history should be monitored

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© Monkey Business

Children with the risk factors of family history and craniofacial anomalies should have their hearing monitored throughout early childhood, whereas children with the risk factor of lower birth rate should not, an Australian study has concluded. The aim of the research, conducted by the University of Queensland, was to determine the risk factors most likely to predict the occurrence of postnatal hearing loss. This study involved children who were born in Queensland, Australia, between September 2004 and December 2009, who had received

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