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Sivantos and Widex merge to become WS Audiology

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Understanding parental speech to improve hearing aids

Research

©Fotolia-st-fotograf

Recent research on the characteristics of child-directed speech provides more evidence that mothers and fathers speak to their young children in a different way.

Research presented at the 169th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, held in Pittsburgh, PA (USA), offers new evidence that fathers speak to their children in a different way than mothers. Although both use child-directed speech known as “motherese”, the sing-song, high pitch tone used when talking to infants and children, there appear to be differences in the way each parent approaches communication.

Scientists from Washington State University’s Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences analyzed data from all-day recordings of the interactions between 11 children with a mean age of 30 months and their parents. They found that fundamental frequency was different when comparing findings for the two parents, as well as frequency variability and range.

The findings suggest that the two distinct forms of child-directed speech may complement one another for the child’s language development. “Dads spoke to their children more like they spoke to other adults rather than in a special way,” said lead author Mark Vandam. “We’ve hypothesized that children get to try out certain kinds of speech with mom and get to try out other kinds of speech with dad.”

The researchers hope that this initial study will lead to more research and provide a way to improve speech recognition algorithms used in hearing aids and cochlear implants for children with hearing impairments.

Source: Tech Times

C.S.

'Contact lens' for the ear project on cusp of clinical testing
'Contact lens' for the ear project on cusp of clinical testing

Innovation

Dr. Dominik Kaltenbacher © Vibrosonic

A "completely new alternative to a normal hearing device"—an eardrum-hugging disc using a piezoelectric transducer and labelled by its inventors a "contact lens" for the ear—now has the home straight of its development in sight.

EUHA 2019: Watch the trailer and save the date!
EUHA 2019: Watch the trailer and save the date!

Congress

The 64th International Congress of Hearing Aid Acousticians and Trade Exhibition will take place 16-18 October 2019 in Nürnberg.

Are patients with psoriatic arthritis at risk for hearing loss?
Are patients with psoriatic arthritis at risk for hearing loss?

comorbidity

© Nick Youngson CC BY-SA 3.0 Alpha Stock Images

A first-ever multicentred study to evaluate hearing in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) suggests clinicians should be aware that patients with this skin condition may be at risk of developing hearing loss.

NICE criteria review means 70% more NHS cochlear implants annually in UK by 2024
NICE criteria review means 70% more NHS cochlear implants annually in UK by 2024

CI

© Mingasson-Advanced Bionics

A significant rise in the number of UK NHS patients receiving cochlear implants (CIs) will follow a long-overdue criteria revision by the standards-setting body NICE.

New regional ENT plan for the Pacific
New regional ENT plan for the Pacific

Public health

ARR

Australian and New Zealand ENT and Audiology experts have been meeting this spring with their counterparts from 6 Pacific Islands to help develop a plan to tackle an alarming regional shortage in hearing health equipment and workforce.

To be, or not to be … together?
To be, or not to be … together?

Joint conference

© V.A.

The second collaborative conference with the British Academy of Audiology (BAA) and British Society of Audiology (BSA) and the British Society of Hearing Aid Audiologists (BSHAA) – Hearing: A Sense of Purpose – took place in Bristol on 25 March.

Auditory nerve implant research wins $9.7m US health grant
Auditory nerve implant research wins $9.7m US health grant

ANI

© Philol - Fotolia

A sizeable research grant from the US National Institutes for Health (NIH) has set up the University of Minnesota to lead a global project into developing a different kind of implant to the cochlear variety, one that can restore normal hearing.

Company Directory

New products

Auditdata: tools to excel in businessAuditdata: tools to excel in business

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As the global hearing profession faces change and what seems to be many threats, we think it is imperative that businesses have access to the best tools and data. [ ... ]

Oticon launches groundbreaking Oticon Opn SOticon launches groundbreaking Oticon Opn S

© Oticon

Oticon Opn S takes the open sound experience and the unique benefits of BrainHearing™ to the next level, and features the world’s first system to [ ... ]

Oticon Opn Play™ Premium a breakthrough in paediatric hearing care Oticon Opn Play™ Premium a breakthrough in paediatric hearing care

© Oticon

Oticon Opn Play™ breaks with conventional hearing technology by opening up a new world of sound for children and ensures  [ ... ]